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Game of the Month!

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Game of the Month!

Postby iamachessstudent » Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:06 pm

Net-Chess Game of the Month #1

Welcome to my first Net-Chess Game of the Month column!
I hope this will spread some good chess chat and ideas...I'm picking games played form this site, usually 1, at rare time2 perhaps 2 to illustrate points! I hope to be topical and illustrate themes at different points, such as the King-hunt, sacrifices and other chess related positions...Ratings of the two (2) players will not matter. You can privately e mail or message me games if youd like me to consider them; Ill go through all requests. Let's hope we can make this into something fun and any other analysis, theories, observations, criticisms or congratulations will be printed with out deleting :)

Now lets get onto the First Game of the Month:

[Event "m1260019876"]
[Site "net-chess.com"]
[Date "2010.01.15"]
[Round "1"]
[White "iamachessstudent"]
[Black "martijn"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2676"]
[BlackElo "2776"]
[Game "g1105007686"]

ECO Code: E32: Nimzo-Indian, classical (4.Qc2)


This first game is against one of my closest friends and hardest opponents on this site: Martijn; we have played over 100 games on this site; most in sets of matches and this is one of the earliest decisive wins for one us on the site, 2010!

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 The Nimzo-Indian Defense, an old venerable defense made popular by Aron Nimzovitch..father of the Hyper-Modern age. 4.Qc2 The Classical Variation...one of the most popular variation for White. 4...0-0 the most popular response for black, over 12,000 games in my database! 5.e4 This is called the Central Variation. Once the almost automatic reply for White here was 5.a3, but in time 5.e4 though very suspect in the 1930's and 1940's has now become a very lethal weapon for White. Black can immediately strike in the center with ...d5, or, as my opponent does, use a flank strike against Whites pawn center which is more risky, but played often. 5...c5 Instead of the popular 6...d5!,black decides to stir up complications, striking at the d4 pawn and clearing the way for his Queen to get to a5 early, but in doing so he allows 6.e5 Attacking the f6 Knight and gaining a large pawn center. 6...cxd4 6...Ne8 is much more passive and gives White a great choice between a) 7.a3 Bxc3+, 8.bxc3 with a great center and the two Bishops or b) 7.dxc5 Nc6; 8.Nf3 Bxc5; 9.Bd3 with good King-side attacking chances. 7.a3 NOT 7.exf6?? dxc3; 8.bxc3 Qxf6+- 7...Qa5 As we see, Black heads for complications early on! 7...Bxc3; 8.bxc3 again leaves White with a powerful bishop pair and Center. 8.axb4! 8.exf6 dxc3; 9.axb4 Qxa1 transposes. 8...Qxa1 9.exf6 dxc3 10. fxg7 the most natural move tho 10.bxc3 has been tried and not done well after 10...e5! 10...10...Re8 the correct way; Black refrains from an immediate 10...Kxg7 because of 11.Qxc3+ f6; 12.Bd3 when the Black King is very exposed indeed! 11.bxc3 This is the REAL starting point for White's Exchange sacrifice (Whites A rook for Black's c3 Bishop....rook for Bishop) theory!
Black now has to get his Queen off a1 or find a way to justify it being there, and do this making sure nothing bad is happening to his King. White is underdeveloped, but his pieces will come out fast and bother the black King. 11...a5 A principled but double-edged move. Nowadays more popular is 11...e5!? but in 20120, it has not been discovered or played yet! White does not want the a file to become open so he plays 12.b5 e5 Trying to open the position before White gets developed. 13.Nh3 d5 14.Ng5! lessening the effect of the coming ...e4 14...e4 If black plays 14...Bf5 instead, then 15.Qxf5 Qxc1+; 16.Ke2 wins for White because of the UN-coordinated black pieces. 15.Be2 more development 15...d4 Now black decides to bust the Queen out of a1! 16.cxd4 Qxd4 here we can try and asses the position for the first time; Black has freed his Queen, and his King is fairly safe, but Whites position should be preferred. Tho down the exchange (R for B) all of his pieces are better then Black's and his King is much safer. 17.0-0! It looks tempting to play 17.Nxf7 Kxf7; 18.Bh5+ Kg8; 19.Bxe8 since it looks so strong but after the amazing move 19...Qe5! White's bishop is trapped! 17...Qxg7 Novelty! The only previous game with this variation went 17...Bf5 and after 18.Bb2 Qd8; 19.Qc1! Looks fantastic and was what I had planned to play in my pre game preparation.:) And if 17...Kxg7???, then 18.Bb2 Qxb2; 19.Qxb2+ f6; 20.Qd4+- wins for White! 18.Bh5 Attacking the f7 square again. 18...Re7 If 18...Rf8; 19.Qd2 Nd7; 20.Ba3+- is again crushing for White. 19.Rd1 Nd7; 20.Nxe4 This position is very difficult for black to play, there are numerous threats to his King and his QR and QB are totally non-developed. It is no surprise his next move is a blunder 20...Qe5? Trying to create some threat; this one in attacking the KN on e4..but maybe, just maybe 20...a4!? pushing his passed pawn could give some counter-play and derail White's idea of a K-side attack?! 21.f3! Preparing c5 as well. 21...f6 Black does not consider playing 21...Qxh5?? because of the great move [b][b]22.Rxd7![/b] [/b]With a mate threat 22...Re6; 23.Rd8+ Kg7; 25.Rd5+- and again White is winning! 22.Rd5 intending c5 22...Qa1; 23.c5 Kg7 Again perhaps 23...a4! is best using that passed pawn for counter-play. then after 24.Rd1 Qe5 Black is still lost tho he is fighting! 24.Kf2 Re5; 25.Bb2 Rxd5 25...Qxb2 does not save Black now...26.Rxd7+! (26.Qxb2 Rxd5; 27.c6 bxc6; 28.bxc6 Ne5+-) 26...Bxd7; 27.Qxb2! +- game over! 26.Bxa1 BLACK RESIGNS A thrilling game and I hope I have been able to help you understand and enjoy the game as much as I did when I played it!




Net-Chess Game of the Month #2

Welcome to Game of the Month #2, and as stated in the previous game; I wanted to show 2 gams against one of my usual and difficult opponents Martijn. In this game, I'm treated the same way that I treated him in Game #1. I choose an off theory opening and am so severely punished, I never really get a chance in the game to work out of my bind! Lets take a look:



[Event "m1267142972"]
[Site "net-chess.com"]
[Date "2010.03.26"]
[Round "1"]
[White "martijn"]
[Black "iamachessstudent"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2813"]
[BlackElo "2771"]
[Game "g1105022081"]

ECO CODE: A60; Modern Benoni, early divergences

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 the Benoni Defense 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 exd5 5.cxd5 Bd6 This is an unusual development of the Bishop to d6, instead of the usual Benoni pawn to d6. This variation, called “the Snake” is rarely used and has a different strategy than normal plans in the Modern Benoni. I 'll try and summarize : Black reckons that in the Modern Benoni, after 5...d6 and 6...g6 that he fianchettoed black bishop weakens the K-side and causes White attacks. Its even worse once the g7 Bishop is exchanged, with huge dark square holes around the Blak King position,. With 5...Bd6 black wants to transfer the Bishop to a5 via c7 (the serpentine tour f8-d6-a5-c7 explains the name if the variation). One drawback to this is White has available the push d5-d6 for himself which seizes space and restricts the Black position. If the black bishop cannot reach a5 and get rid of the c3 Knight, then he has major issues, which is exactly what I experienced in this game. This opening is not very theoretical at all, with only 934 games in the entrire database! 6.Nf3 the most common and good 6...0-0 7.g3 This is a good plan, tho 7.Bg5 is the most dangerous and aggressive. 7...a6?! Planning a typical Benoni ..b5 break soon. But, that being said..Bc7 was the natural and correct way to go with THIS particular opening, since black is Not playing a Benoni..I did not prepare very thoroughly in this game, hoping the offbeat nature of the opening would confuse my opponent and I could play stronger..not a good strategy! Do your research!! 8.Bh3N Now White diverges from the previously play 2 moves: 8.a4 or 8.Bg2; and a curious note on all 6 times that 6.Bg3 was played. White is 0-6!! it turns out that with his text move, White is already eyeing the f5 square and also counting on Black's ignorance of the opening to justify his plan. 8...Re8 Not bad, allowing the bishop a retreat to f8 in case. 9.0-0 b5; 10.Bg5! Becoming aggressive now, wishing to push e4 and start a K-side attack. 10...Bf8?! Missing the point, yes the bishop returns to defend the dark squares around his K-side but he misses a chance to nearly equalize the game by the move 10...h6!?, and after 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Qd3 the position is close to equal and black has a nice Q-side structure ready to go, though a future Ne4 can make Whites life easier as well! 11.e4! Excellent, White now has an impending center pawn force and because of the Knight pin on f6, black has to resort to desperate maneuvers in the early stages of the game to stay alive. 11...b4 gaining time by threatening the c3 Knight. I can't see a better move for black at this time, this early in the game. 12.Na4 Rxe4?! Another waste of time! Black had to try 11..Bb7!? += To develop and maintain tension!13.Rc1 Pressure on the c5 pawn now, and the pawn cannot be defended... 13...h6 Now 13...Bb7 simply is bad; 14.Nxc5 Bxc5; 15.Rxc5 and White wins a pawn, keeping a dominating position. 14.Bxf6! Excellent plan, liquidation and winning a clean pawn! 14...Qxf6; 15.Nxc5 Re8; 16.Ne4 Qd8 Of course now 16...Rxe4 is bad; 17.Rxc8 and there all are kinds of targets in the Black position, plus his King position is weak to say the least. 16...Qxb2? Is also bad; 17.Re1 Rd8; 18.Rc2+- and again White's position is very strong. 17.Bf5 Now we see the purpose of the move 8.Bh3.White is preparing a K-side attack. 17...Bb7 Trying to get his pieces developed. 18.Re1 a5?? The final blunder in a position that has been a strain since move 9...the only chance at “some counter play” I can see was 18...Qb6 with dark square control and an active Queen; but it is still White's game to win. The text move does nothing for the position and gives White free reign to attack, which he does in a grand manner! 19.Nfg5! K-side attack at its best! 19...g6 Trying to clamp off the white squares, and if the Knight was taken a nice variation ensures: 19...hxg5; 20.Qh5! g6; 21.Bxg6 fxg6; 22.Qxg6+ Kh8; 23.Nf6!(threatening mate at h7 or g8 23...Qxf6 forced! There is no other way to avoid checkmate. 24. Qxf6+ Kh7; 25.Rxe8 and Black is literally blown off the board! A nice variation :) 20.Qf3 hxg5 20...Bxd5 is a last ditch effort to avoid the end, but after 21.Bxg6! Its over e.g. 21...Kh8; 22.Nxf7+ Bxf7; 23.Qxf7 and again Black's position is in rambles! 21.Bxg6! With the mate threat at f7 and f6. 21...fxg6 22.Nf6! And BLACK RESIGNS, lets look at a few variations to enforce Blacks decision to resign: a)22...Kf7; 23.Ne4+ double attack (23.Rxe8 discovered attack)
b) 22...Kg7; 23.Rxe8 discovered attack;
c) 22...Kh8; 23.Rxe8 discovered attack;
ci) 22...Qxf6; 23.Qxf6 and game over!

Another exciting game, especially if you like attacks, discovered attacks and sacrifices! I really was whacked in this game..and I hope you enjoyed reading about it as much as I have annotating and explaining it !
See you next month!:)
Credits: I used Chessbase 2011 Megabase; Hirarcs 13; Starting Out: Benoni Systems by A. Raetsky and M. Chetverik; Challenging the Nimzo-Indian by Danny Vigorito in referencing and data research, variation checking for both these games, All other annotations are my originals.
iamachessstudent
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:35 pm

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby gmiller » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:51 am

Greg Miller
gmiller
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 1999 11:13 am
Location: Jeffersonville, IN

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby gmiller » Tue Jan 22, 2013 10:57 am

Thanks. Looks pretty good. A couple of suggestions for future posts:

1. surround your comments with brackets { }. This makes your post valid PGN so people can copy it into their favorite chess database to play through it and analyze it.
2. Castling is O-O [the letter O], rather than the number 0. Again, this just makes it easier for people to go through in their own database or viewer program.
Greg Miller
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Site Admin
 
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 1999 11:13 am
Location: Jeffersonville, IN

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby iamachessstudent » Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:01 pm

thanks Gregg!!
Ill be sure to do that next time!!
TY again:)

joshua
iamachessstudent
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:35 pm

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby cliff » Wed Jan 23, 2013 4:49 pm

Excellently done, Josh!

And the boards that Greg added were a great touch, so thanks to Greg also!

I'm looking forward to seeing more, and have perhaps a game of two I've seen you might be interested in dissecting.

Maybe, sometime you could make the games illustrative of certain openings, or variations? Say a Sicilian Defence one month, and maybe a Ruy Lopez variation the next, for example? Just a thought?

Whatever, Keep up the great work, Josh!

- Cliff

:D
cliff
 
Posts: 572
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Location: Toronto

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby iamachessstudent » Wed Jan 23, 2013 7:17 pm

sur eCiff!

Id love to describe and pick apart a sicilian, Lopez , KID or anything that makes interest!
COntact me n let me know )
iamachessstudent
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:35 pm

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby gmiller » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:42 pm

Greg Miller
gmiller
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1239
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 1999 11:13 am
Location: Jeffersonville, IN

Re: Game of the Month!

Postby iamachessstudent » Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:33 pm

TY Greg for the great diagrams!
I so appreciate that my friend :) :)

Joshua
iamachessstudent
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:35 pm


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